Milan: An example of vibrant creativity

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Monday, November 19th, 2012

Milan is proud to claim a first role in establishing an open policy to all religions, starting with the great Roman Emperors Constantine of the West and Licenius of the East. In January of 313, after Constantine’s victory at the Milvian bridge, they signed the Edict of Milan granting religious tolerance. Soon Constantine would build a “New Rome” he called Constantinople on the site of a small town called Bizance on the Golden horn of Asia. History would call it Byzantium. Known for its splendors, Constantinople dazzled visitors for hundreds of years, marveling at the works of one of Rome’s greatest Emperors. Now, an exhibition at the Palazzo Reale, Constantine AD 313, celebrates this Milanese legacy until March 2013. Biographies of his life are available in the bookstore and we invite you to share in the splendors of both the east and west we have brought together here in Milan. A small reflection of the wonders of Byzantium.

 

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    Monday, November 19th, 2012

    Milan is proud to claim a first role in establishing an open policy to all religions, starting with the great Roman Emperors Constantine of the West and Licenius of the East. In January of 313, after Constantine’s victory at the Milvian bridge, they signed the Edict of Milan granting religious tolerance. Soon Constantine would build a “New Rome” he called Constantinople on the site of a small town called Bizance on the Golden horn of Asia. History would call it Byzantium. Known for its splendors, Constantinople dazzled visitors for hundreds of years, marveling at the works of one of Rome’s greatest Emperors. Now, an exhibition at the Palazzo Reale, Constantine AD 313, celebrates this Milanese legacy until March 2013. Biographies of his life are available in the bookstore and we invite you to share in the splendors of both the east and west we have brought together here in Milan. A small reflection of the wonders of Byzantium.